Tuesday, December 8, 2015

#262 : Only Wheat Not White by Varsha Dixit : Review

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GENRE: Fiction - Romance
NUMBER OF PAGES: 262
FORMAT: Digital
SERIES / STANDALONE: Standalone
HOW I GOT THIS BOOK: Review copy from the writer as part of The Book Club Tours in exchange for an honest review! Thanks a lot guys!
REVIEW:
Interracial relationships are something that really doesn’t sit well with Indians. Though that prejudice is fast changing, yet people grapple to come into term with such relationships. This story is about two such relationships.

Our protagonists Elia, heads to US on H1 visa to work as a consultant. Under the ruse of employment, she has a bigger agenda – building a relationship with her sister who married a “firangi” and ended up shunned by her family. Elia soon realizes that her sister Sheila’s marriage is on the rocks. To manage expenses Elia takes up a second job in a strip club as an accountant. She keeps bumping awkwardly into Brett only to fall in love with him later. The story is all about prejudices and breaking it from there on.

Having been raised is a typical Indian family with similar prejudices, I could relate with Elia’s conflict when it came to accepting her love for Brett. In her shoes, I would be such a coward too. The story initially seemed a bit boring and I was sort of angry with the writer for making Elia hate her sister’s husband. The characterization was thus just perfect making the story overall a pleasurable read. Applause to the writer for shaping up Elia’s character realistically like a 26 year old’s! (More like a teenie bit older version of me!)  She is accident prone, funny, cares for her friends and comes out with flying colors when challenged. More than the emotions of the characters, the humane flaws of each character kept the story alive and kept me hooked to the book. My only peeve point would be the initial part of the story. I felt a bit disorienting and confused only to recover from it later with a bang. Felt like the writer picked up paramount of confidence while writing the second half of the book. The writing was fresh and crisp towards the latter half of the story. Having said that, I felt the story would have actually ended better if Elia’s parents were brought in. Or may be the writer has a second book about this planned?


MY SAY: An engaging read that does enough justice to the most common prejudice of the Indian society.

RATING:
PLOT : 7/10
NARRATION: 7/10
CHARACTERISATION: 7/10
BOREDOM QUOTIENT: 1/10 (Lower the better)
OVERALL RATING: 7/10

Check out more about the book in this spotlight post here!

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